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Press Releases > ACMT Expands the North American Snakebite Registry - April 22, 2014

ACMT Expands the North American Snakebite Registry - April 22, 2014

posted on 5:59 AM, June 26, 2014
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The North American Snakebite Registry was created by The American College of Medical
Toxicology (ACMT) in 2013. Data from the pilot year were presented at the ACMT Annual
Scientific Meeting in March, as the College announced expansion of the Registry.
 
Phoenix, Arizona (PRWEB) April 22, 2014 -- In 2013, the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT)
launched the North American Snakebite Registry with eight participating medical toxicology centers. This
Registry was developed in order to create opportunities for collaborative research and education among
physicians with expertise in the diagnosis and management of snake envenomation. Data from the pilot year
were presented in March at the ACMT Annual Scientific Meeting, as the College announced expansion of the
project to additional centers across the United States.
 
Bites by venomous snakes affect up to 10,000 people in the US each year. The snakes responsible for the vast
majority of envenomations are the pit vipers, which include copperheads, cottonmouths, and rattlesnakes.
Rattlesnakes typically cause the most severe illness. Though fewer than ten deaths from snakebite are reported
annually in the US, hundreds of people are hospitalized and experience prolonged disability as a result of their
bites. The Snakebite Registrywas created to allow for a better understanding of the factors that may influence
the severity and outcome of a snake envenomation, such as co-existing illness, medications, and response to
specific treatments. According to Michelle Ruha, MD, the lead investigator on the Registry project, “The data
from our first year demonstrate that snake envenomation affects many vulnerable populations, including people
with chronic medical conditions, children and the elderly. As we learn how different populations react to venom
and how they respond to different treatment strategies, we can better target our research to achieve the ultimate
goal of improving care and outcomes of people who are bitten by snakes.”
 
The North American Snakebite Registry is a project of the Toxicology Investigators Consortium (ToxIC),
which was created in 2009 by ACMT to advance the accumulation and dissemination of knowledge of medical
aspects of human poisoning. Data that is collected is housed in the ToxIC Registry and includes the clinical
syndromes associated with various poisons and venoms and the treatments used to care for poisoned and
envenomed patients. The data held in the Registry is secure, and is de-identified so that no link can be made
back to individual patients.
 
The American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT) is a professional, nonprofit association of physicians
with recognized expertise in medical toxicology. The College is dedicated to advancing the science and practice
of medical toxicology.