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Press Releases > Journal of Medical Toxicology Focuses on New Street Drugs - April 11, 2012

Journal of Medical Toxicology Focuses on New Street Drugs - April 11, 2012

posted on 4:39 PM, June 24, 2014
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The Journal of Medical Toxicology, the official journal of the American College of Medical
Toxicology, focuses on Emerging Drugs of Abuse in its March issue, including bath salts and
synthetic marijuana.
 
Phoenix, Arizona (PRWEB) April 11, 2012 -- The Journal of Medical Toxicology(JMT), the official journal of
the American College of Medical Toxicology (ACMT), starts its eighth year in print with an issue dedicated to
new street drugs producing serious effects, even death.
 
“It is now estimated that 100 persons die of drug overdose daily in the US, a threefold increase in overdose
deaths in less than 20 years,” states an editorial by Mark Mycyk, M.D., the associate editor of JMT.
 
Synthetic marijuana products (e.g., Spice, K2) and bath salts (e.g., ivory wave) contain new street drugs that
can cause severe toxicity in users. Labeling bath salts as “not for human consumption,” allows the sale of illicit
amphetamine-like cathionine substances. Synthetic cannabinoids are sprayed on plant products and marketed as
synthetic marijuana. Fatal cases from bath salts in a 40 year old male and a 24 year old female are reported, in
addition to severe effects related to marijuana use. Other drugs of abuse are reviewed, including Kratom and
Salvia.
 
“As soon as street drugs are outlawed, abusers come up with new formulations to attempt to achieve a legal
high. As medical toxicologists, we are on the front line and see what new adverse effects these drugs cause.
Unfortunately, many users don’t realize how dangerous these chemicals are until people start getting sick or
dying,” said Editor-in-Chief, Leslie R. Dye, M.D.
 
The March issue of JMT also highlights a new study (the iHeal Project) in which skin sensors are used to help
recovering addicts identify the onset of cravings and to provide early relapse prevention.
 
ACMT is a professional, nonprofit association of physicians with recognized expertise in medical toxicology.
The College is dedicated to advancing the science and practice of medical toxicology through a variety of
activities.
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Contact Information
ACMT
American College of Medical Toxicology
http://www.acmt.net>
623-533-6340
Online Web 2.0 Version